Start Working Out Again with a Fitness Reboot

By Molly Cerreta Smith

For many people, coronavirus gym closures and quarantine requirements threw regular workout routines right out the window. But now that gyms (including the Village!) are reopening, it’s time to get back on track! While getting back into a workout routine may seem a little daunting after several months off, we’re here to offer some tips to help you start working out again!

 

Step, Don’t Jump, In — It may have been months since you’ve seen the inside of a gym, so don’t expect to jump right into your pre-quarantine exercise routine. After a long break from a regular workout routine, your body is likely in a different place. Start slow as you get back into your groove and build up to where you were — and beyond — little by little.

 

Make a Commitment — When it’s time to reboot your fitness, it helps to set a goal and commit to it. Whether you want to get back to the gym three days a week or you want to lose that “quarantine 15,” you have to make a commitment — and stick to it. Defining your goals can help make committing to them a bit easier, too.

 

Do What You Love — You’re more likely to get back into the gym if you’re looking forward to it rather than dreading it. So when it comes to what type of workouts you commit to, don’t force yourself to do something you’re just not into. If running on the treadmill sounds like a drag, consider a Zumba or Pilates class instead. For those that love the outdoors, hit the tennis courts; and those that like one-on-one instruction could schedule a session with a personal trainer.

 

Be Accountable — Many people will be accountable to someone (or something) else. Accountability tips include; treat your time at the gym like any other appointment or meeting you would have with a doctor or a colleague, get a wearable and set a goal,  sign up for a class or a personal training session, or plan to meet a friend for a joint workout.

 

Get Some Motivational Mojo — Give yourself a little incentive to reach your finish line… In other words — treat yourself! Set mini-goals for yourself as you commit to your fitness reboot and reward yourself as you achieve them! One important component of this tip is to reward yourself with something other than food. While the occasional splurge isn’t going to totally derail your fitness reboot, it’s better to simply enjoy a sweet treat every once in a while than to associate it as a “reward.” Instead, get a manicure or a massage, or indulge in any other non-food related reward like new workout clothes or high-end earbuds.

 

Identify Your Challenges — When planning your fitness reboot, set yourself up for success by working with your patterns, not against them. For example, if you’re a night owl that loves to sleep in and press snooze until you absolutely have to get up, don’t plan to wake up at 4:00 a.m. to hit the gym. Instead, plan for an after-work or after dinner workout. That said, don’t be afraid to step outside your comfort zone in the name of overcoming your challenges. For those that typically shy away from social gatherings might enjoy a group fitness class more than they could have ever imagined! The point is you never know until you try.

 

Don’t Give Up — Getting back into a regular workout routine can be tough. There might be days when you’re sore or tired or simply just don’t feel like working out. It’s okay to give yourself a pass once in a while. But don’t give up entirely! Remind yourself why you wanted to commit to a fitness reboot in the first place. Whether it’s to lose weight, to feel and look better, or to get healthier, it’s not going to happen overnight. But it will happen with consistent efforts and by not giving up!

 

The Village Clubs & Spas are thrilled to welcome back its members. For those that need a little extra help with their fitness reboot, schedule a session with a personal trainer or ask a staff member for some additional tips the next time you come in.

 

 

 

 

 

10 Exercises to Spice Up Your Leg Routine

By Meggan Marks, Personal Trainer

Whether you are new to lifting or not, it’s always good to add variety to your routine. Below are 10 leg exercises that will help spice up your routine:

 

Forward Lunge with Kettlebell Pass

Muscles Involved: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Glutes, and Calves

Equipment: Kettlebell

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps each leg for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets, 10-12 reps each leg.

Execution: Begin standing with feet shoulder-width apart. Step forward, bend knees to 90 degrees, then pass the kettlebell under the front leg and return to start. Be sure to keep the front knee behind the toe to help keep the knee safe. Repeat on other leg.

 

 

Step-Ups

Muscles Involved: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Hip Flexors, and Calves

Equipment: Box or bench, dumbbells, weighted bar or kettlebell

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps each side for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets, 10-12 reps each leg.

Execution: Stand facing box/bench, with feet shoulder-width apart. Place foot on box/bench then push up to place other foot on box/bench while holding weight. Step down with one foot, repeat on other leg.

 

Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

Muscles Involved: Hamstrings, Quadriceps, Glutes, Lats, Trapezius, and Abs

Equipment: Dumbbell, kettlebell, or weighted bar

Frequency: 3 sets, 8-10 reps, and light weight for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets, 10-12 reps each leg.

Execution: Stand with feet close together and back straight as you bend over and lift one leg behind you until your body is parallel to the floor, then return to start. Complete all reps on one side first then switch legs. Make sure to keep your back straight and don’t round the shoulders. Keep the weight close to the stationary leg.

 

Sumo Squats

Muscles Involved: Glutes, Hamstrings, Quadriceps, Hip Adductors, and Calves

Equipment: Dumbbells, kettlebell, weighted bar, or weighted plate

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets, 10-12 reps

Execution: Stand with feet wider than shoulder-width, toes pointed out. While holding weight, lower your body until your knees are bent about 90 degrees, then return to start position. Make sure your toes are sticking out enough to allow your knees to track out with your toes. If your knees go over your toes, push your hips back or move your feet out wider.

 

Landmine Reverse Lunge

Muscles Involved: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Glutes, Calves, and Abs

Equipment: Landmine with bar and weight plates

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps each leg for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets, 10-12 reps each leg.

Execution: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart. While holding the end of the bar, step back with one leg, bend both knees until they are bent 90 degrees and then return to start. Repeat on other side. Make sure you have a secure hold of the bar and make sure to keep your knees behind your toes.

 

 

Bulgarian Split Squats

Muscles Involved: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Glutes, Hip Adductors and Abs

Equipment: Box or bench, dumbbells, kettlebells or use body weight

Frequency: 3 sets, 8-10 reps each leg, and light or no weight for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets, 10-12 reps each leg

Execution: Stand facing away from a box or bench with one foot on the box or bench. While holding weight, bend both knees to 90 degrees. Return to start and repeat on the other leg. Make sure your front knee does not go over your front toe.

 

Goblet Squats

Muscles Involved: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Glutes, Abs, Back and Shoulder Stabilizers

Equipment: Dumbbell or kettlebell

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets and 10-12 reps

Execution: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart; toes can be pointed out slightly. While holding weight, bend your knees until they are bent 90 degrees and then return to start. Make sure you keep your hips back, chest up and elbows tucked in close to your body.

 

Side Lunge with Sliders

Muscles Involved: Glutes, Hip Adductors, Hip Abductors, Hamstrings, Quadriceps, and Calves

Equipment: 1 slider, dumbbells, kettlebell, or use bodyweight

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps on each leg for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets and 10-12 reps each leg

Execution: Stand with feet-shoulder width apart. With one foot on the slider while other is on the carpet, bend one knee until it is bent 90 degrees while pushing the slider out to the side until the knee is straight. Return to start and repeat with the other leg. Make sure to keep your knees behind your toes and hips back.

 

Swiss Ball Hamstring Curls

Muscles Involved: Hamstrings, Glutes, Sartorius, Calves, and Obliques

Equipment: Swiss ball and a mat

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps for beginners. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets and 10-12 reps

Execution: Lay on your back with arms straight on floor and heels and lower calves on top of the ball. Push hips up off the floor until parallel with the floor and bend your knees as you pull the ball towards your hips. Extend legs and lower hips to the floor as you return to start. To lessen the strain on your neck and challenge the abs more, bend your elbows so that only your elbows and upper arms are on the floor.

 

TRX Pistol Squats

Muscles Involved: Glutes, Quadriceps, Hamstrings and Calves

Equipment: TRX Suspension Trainer

Frequency: 3 sets and 8-10 reps each leg. For more advanced lifters: 4 sets and 10-12 reps each leg

Execution: Hold both handles on the TRX while facing the anchor point (carabiner clip). Keep arms straight and while holding one leg straight out in front of your body, bend the other knee to 90 degrees. Return to starting position and repeat on other leg. Make sure your chest is pointed up, don’t round your shoulders and keep the knee behind your toe.

 

 

About the Author: Meggan Marks is a Personal Trainer at The Village Health Clubs and Spas at DC Ranch. She has a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Exercise Physiology and over 10 years of experience as a Personal Trainer. She can be contacted at mmarks@dmbclubs.com.

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